Tag: Four Seasons Restaurant

September 6, 2013
Previous
Next

Unicorn Series
2013
The Four Seasons Restaurant
99 East 52nd Street, NYC

Woodward Gallery is proud to present Red Grooms, The Unicorn Series in the Pool Room at The Four Seasons Restaurant.


American Artist Red Grooms (b. 1937) is best known for his colorful Pop Art constructions depicting frenetic scenes of modern urban life. In this body of work, Grooms has reinterpreted the iconography of the Metropolitan Museum’s medieval Unicorn Tapestries. Jonathan Gilmore, Art in America wrote,


“(The Unicorn series is a) …carnivalesque narrative that relates the hunt for the unicorn, its corpse being carried triumphantly into town and its eventual resurrection in a utopian setting, happily domesticated among tiny peasants…. these magnificent paintings, which are so vividly brushed and so jam-packed with figures, animals, foliage and pattern that they rival the actual tapestries in texture and decorative richness…”


Red Grooms’ work has been exhibited in galleries across the United States, as well as Europe, and Japan. His art is included in collections of thirty-nine museums, including the Art Institute of Chicago, The Museum of Modern Art (MOMA), The Whitney Museum of American Art, The Metropolitan Museum of Fine Art (Met), Cleveland Museum of Art, The Carnegie Museum of Art, The Knoxville Museum of Art, and the Cheekwood Botanical Garden and Museum of Art.
Grooms was awarded the Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Academy of Design in 2003.

September 7, 2012

 

2012
The Four Seasons Restaurant
99 East 52nd Street, NYC

 

Woodward Gallery is currently featuring Kenji Nakayama’s photorealistic, hand-cut stencil and enamel paintings in the private dining rooms at the historic Four Seasons Restaurant.
Nakayama’s dedication and work ethic is unprecedented and very well respected. A mechanical engineer by formal education, Kenji Nakayama made a significant and resolute life change in 2004 moving from his home in Hokkaido, Japan. Bringing his cultural heritage to the United States, Nakayama incorporates Japanese and American influences within traditional sign painting techniques.


Kenji became involved with street art to document and respond to his surrounding environment, and as a method to capture significant moments in his daily life. His elaborate process involves crafting original, hand-cut, multi-layer stencils which become one complete image when illuminated with colorful spray enamel. This deeply personal technique serves as a diary from start to finish. In the studio, each intricately cut stencil painting often takes months to complete combining hours of concentration with a spiritualistic and
meditative-like disposition.


Soon after Kenji’s arrival to the States, he met Director John Woodward and was challenged with the opportunity to paint the outdoor wall on their Project Space. This was followed by an invitation to exhibit another large scale installation in the Bank of America, SoHo. People were in awe of Kenji’s complex murals. The public continues to show great support by embracing this Artist for his quiet determination, skill and exciting new contribution to our culture.
Kenji Nakayama left his homeland driven to develop and master high levels of detail with an intense discipline in his art. Kenji describes, “My process is like dust. Each little grain and speck adds up, and soon becomes a mountain.”

November 4, 2011
Previous
Next



Flowers
Fall 2011
The Four Seasons Restaurant
99 East 52nd Street, NYC

Iris, 2008
Oil on canvas
Canvas: 48 x 54 in; 121.9 x 137.2 cm
Framed: 49 x 55 in; 124.5 x 139.7 cm


Peony, 2011
Oil on canvas
Canvas: 48 x 54 in; 121.9 x 137.2 cm
Framed: 49 x 55 in; 124.5 x 139.7 cm


Rose, 2008
Oil on canvas
Canvas: 48 x 54 in; 121.9 x 137.2 cm
Framed: 49 x 55 in; 124.5 x 139.7 cm


Lily, 2008
Oil on canvas
Canvas: 48 x 54 in; 121.9 x 137.2 cm
Framed: 49 x 55 in; 124.5 x 139.7 cm

January 28, 2011
Previous
Next

 

Four Seasons Restaurant
2011
The Four Seasons Restaurant
99 East 52nd Street, NYC

Charles Hinman is known for his exploration of the three-dimensional canvas, specifically the ways in which he creates a visual dialogue between the illusory space of the painting and the actual space on which the sculptured object rests. Hinman embraces contrast on multiple levels, through his use of color, texture, light and shadow.


Charles Hinman was born and raised in Syracuse, New York, where he attended art classes at the Syracuse Museum of Fine Arts (now the Everson Museum of Art). In 1954, while pursuing his BFA at Syracuse University, Hinman was a professional baseball pitcher with the Milwaukee Braves minor leagues. Hinman received his BFA in 1955 and went on to study at the Art Students League of New York for a year before serving in the army from 1956 to 1958. Hinman taught mechanical drawing at the Staten Island Academy (1960-1962) and was the shop instructor at the Woodmere Academy on Long Island (1962-1964). In these two positions, Hinman developed carpentry and engineering skills that gave him the ability to construct his own shaped canvases with complex three-dimensional curves. Hinman worked at Coenties Slip from 1960 to 1962 in a studio shared with James Rosenquist whom he had met when they were students at the Art Students League. Seeking an independent path in 1963, Hinman created his first shaped canvases in his studio on 95th Street. In 1965, Hinman moved into a larger studio on the Bowery, where Will Insley, who was also working in shaped canvases, and Robert Indiana had studios as well.


Charles Hinman first received critical attention in the exhibition 7 New Artists at the Sidney Janis Gallery in May 1964 where he exhibited flat canvases cut at angles and suspended by cords. The other artists in the exhibition were: Larry Bell, Robert Irwin, Norman Ives, Robert Slutsky, Robert Whitman, and Arakawa. Hinman went on to add the third dimension to his shaped canvases while examining the subtle boundary between the picture plane and the space in front of it, as well as playing with the idea of literal versus illusionistic depth. Frank Stella and Henry Geldzahler included Hinman in their exhibition, Shape and Structure, at Tibor de Nagy in January 1965. The exhibition also included Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Carl Andre, Will Insley, Neil Williams, and Larry Bell. In the exhibition, Art in Process: The Visual Development of a Structure at Finch College Museum of Art in May 1966, structures by Judd, Sol LeWitt, Robert Morris, and Robert Smithson and shaped canvases by Hinman, Will Insley, and Sven Lukin were shown. Three Young Americans at the Oberlin College Art Museum in 1965 featured Hinman, Larry Poons, and Neil Williams. The Whitney Museum of American Art included Hinman in Young America 1965 and the following year in Art of the United States 1670-1966, as well as the 1966 annual. Hinman exhibited in the Art Institute of Chicago’s annual in 1966 and 1969. In Painting: Out from the Wall at the Des Moines Art Center in February-March 1968, Hinman exhibited alongside Insley, Lukin, George Ortman, and David Novros.


Hinman’s work is in the permanent collections of: the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, NY; the Museum of Modern Art, New York, NY; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, California; the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Phoenix Art Museum, Arizona; the Denver Art Museum, Colorado; the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY; the Nagaoka Museum in Japan, the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, the Tel Aviv Museum in Israel, and the Pfalzgalerie Museum in Germany, among other museums.

November 19, 2010
Previous
Next

The Four Seasons of Hope
May 2011
The Four Seasons Restaurant
99 East 52nd St at Lexington Avenue

 

On HOPE by Arthur C. Danto
written on the occassion of the Robert Indiana Hope exhibition
All works:


Unique Silkscreen inks on canvas
96 x 96 inches; 243.8 x 243.8 cm/each
Signed
© 2010 Robert Indiana
Publisher: American Image Atelier
Printer: Gary Lichtenstein


Exhibition Features
New York Times
Art In America