Category: Woodward Gallery Project Space

February 24, 2022

Happiness and Love

Michael Alan

Spring – Fall 2021
at 132 Eldridge Street, NYC

Artist Michael Alan is equally adept in several mediums. He draws, paints and creates performance art as a living, breathing canvas.  He uses color to push his positive message: art is a feeling that is tangible, audible, visual- an experience to engage in.

 

Michael Alan’s free hand, spray paint mural currently on view at 132 Eldridge Street (off Broome Street) is a joyful expression! His shapes and forms vibrate with a passionate spontaneity. Alan’s source of optimistic creativity is spawn from an intimate place that he expertly scales to the size of his projects.

 

Michael Alan’s drawings are detailed with a concentrated tangle of lines that compulsively change direction to reveal characters, shapes. The art is always a journey, an animated dance to entertain his viewers.  This artist is a compulsive, automatic action painter. He does not step back from the scale of the project to contemplate the image, but instead trusts his commitment to the freestyle vision. The work erupts with colorful imagery winding and bursting with movement.  Michael Alan is the real deal!  His public art is a gift for all to experience- an invigoration for the Lower East Side, NYC.

 

“Michael Alan is the kind of buoyant, visionary artist that comes around once in a generation. His constant innovation and creative interdisciplinary genius inspire(s) all who meet him.” – ART NERD, NY

 

“{Michael Alan’s work is} an escape from earth with a huge taste of a mutating NYC” -NY ART-NEWS

 

“[His art is] To recapture what has been lost and update it with a big splash of paint.” – Ruth La Ferla, THE NEW YORK TIMES

Michael Alan- Interview

About the Space

Woodward Gallery’s new Project Space is the latest effort to continue its mission of enhancing culture within the Manhattan’s Lower East Side community. Accessible to all, please visit Woodward Gallery’s Project Space anytime at 132 Eldridge Street, NYC

 

August 9, 2021

Woodward Gates Project

Woodward Gates Project

Eldridge and Broome Streets, NYC

 

Woodward Gallery has maintained Project Space at 132A Eldridge Street since 2008 for emerging and established street artists and muralists to publicly share their creativity. Over the years, Woodward Gallery’s outdoor art projects have expanded to additional areas.

 

Kehila Kedosha Jahina Synagogue and Museum at 280 Broome Street encouraged Woodward to extend their mural project to coincide with a celebration of the Synagogue’s heritage in the Summer of 2021 (Annual Greek Jewish Festival Website).

 

Woodward Gallery accepted the challenge and refreshed the community awarding a group of selected artists designated space to paint along Broome and Eldridge Streets. Woodward Gallery curated the local roll down gates and supported the featured artists on this project.

 

Experienced in neighborhood improvement efforts, Woodward has helped clean up local graffiti and provide cultural opportunities in their LES neighborhood.

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April 18, 2021

This image is decorative.


Michael Alan
Spring – Fall 2021
at 132 Eldridge Street, NYC
resume_biography

Artist Michael Alan is equally adept in several mediums. He draws, paints and creates performance art as a living, breathing canvas.  He uses color to push his positive message: art is a feeling that is tangible, audible, visual- an experience to engage in.

Michael Alan’s free hand, spray paint mural currently on view at 132 Eldridge Street (off Broome Street) is a joyful expression! His shapes and forms vibrate with a passionate spontaneity. Alan’s source of optimistic creativity is spawn from an intimate place that he expertly scales to the size of his projects.

Michael Alan’s drawings are detailed with a concentrated tangle of lines that compulsively change direction to reveal characters, shapes. The art is always a journey, an animated dance to entertain his viewers.  This artist is a compulsive, automatic action painter. He does not step back from the scale of the project to contemplate the image, but instead trusts his commitment to the freestyle vision. The work erupts with colorful imagery winding and bursting with movement.  Michael Alan is the real deal!  His public art is a gift for all to experience- an invigoration for the Lower East Side, NYC.

“Michael Alan is the kind of buoyant, visionary artist that comes around once in a generation. His constant innovation and creative interdisciplinary genius inspire(s) all who meet him.” ART NERD, NY

“{Michael Alan’s work is} an escape from earth with a huge taste of a mutating NYC” -NY ART-NEWS

“[His art is] To recapture what has been lost and update it with a big splash of paint.” – Ruth La Ferla, THE NEW YORK TIMES

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Selected Press
Meet the Artist Michael Alan Alien from Artiholics
This image is decorative.
About the Space: Woodward Gallery’s new Project Space is the latest effort to continue its mission of enhancing culture within the Manhattan’s Lower East Side community. Accessible to all, please visit Woodward Gallery’s Project Space anytime at 132 Eldridge Street, NYC

March 23, 2019

Down Town Association

DTA, Woodward Gallery, 60 Pine Street, NYC

 

The Down Town Association is a member owned social club dedicated to providing their members and guests with the finest hospitality. A New York City Landmark in Lower Manhattan, the Down Town Association’s Clubhouse is one of New York’s best examples of Romanesque Revival design as well as the second oldest purpose built club building in the United States.

 

Guests are welcome to view Woodward Gallery Art exhibitions by appointment. Please contact Woodward Gallery, or call the DTA directly at (212) 422-1982 to schedule your visit. Guests are encouraged to arrive in business casual attire while on premises.

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January 18, 2016

JM Rizzi
September – November, 2008
Woodward Gallery Project Space

January 18, 2016

LA2
January – February, 2009
Woodward Gallery Project Space

Excerpt from The Village Voice, “Haring’s Silent Partner,” by Colin Moynihan:
“…From 1980 until 1986, Haring and Angel Ortiz (LA2) met often in the Broome Street studio, painting and drawing for up to 15 hours at a stretch on both canvas and urban detritus like statues, urns, and pieces of metal. The partnership was recognized by both artists to be an equal one, Ortiz says, because their artistic styles complemented each other. Ortiz’s calligraphic, interlocking lines vitalized and filled out negative space between Haring’s cleanly drawn shapes. And while Haring was older and far cannier, the energy of Ortiz’s graffiti-like markings brought freshness and street credibility to his work.”


The association was important personally as well as artistically, particularly to Ortiz, who had never experienced life outside the Lower East Side before meeting Haring. He left school at the age of 16 to create art full-time and was thrilled to receive attention from artists and collectors around the world. The two formed a strong relationship, which Haring likened to that of an older and younger brother. Haring invited Ortiz to clubs like Roxy and the Pyramid, where the young artist met Andy Warhol and Boy George. Ortiz took Haring to a Brooklyn train yard where they spray-painted subway cars. Even after the collaboration ended, as Haring’s increasing renown led him to concentrate on solo work, the two remained friendly….”
Artist Resume

January 18, 2016

Sonne Hernandez
March – May, 2009
Woodward Gallery Project Space

Our relationship to screens – televisions, gaming units, mobile phones and computers – informs our understanding of the world. The blurred lines of the screen exist as visual metaphor for the gaps between sensationalized media and reality. The “truth of the moment” inherent in our understanding of the photographic medium (i.e. the camera doesn’t lie) is packaged with compressed bites of information, and our perception of reality is siphoned through this mediated system. The lines of the screen are a physical and visual typo that demarcate the sight of the eyes from the passive glow of the screen.


Immersed in media culture, the revolution will be televised and witnessed through the flattened plane of the screen.

January 18, 2016

Lady Pink
June – August, 2009
Woodward Gallery Project Space

Lady Pink was born in Ecuador, but raised in NYC. In 1979 she started writing graffiti and soon was well known as the only female capable of competing with the boys in the graffiti subculture. Pink painted subway trains from the years 1979-1985. She is considered a cult figure in the hip-hop subculture since the release of the motion picture “Wild Style” in 1982, in which she had a starring role. While still in high school she was already exhibiting paintings in art galleries, and at the age of 21 had her first solo show at the Moore College of Art. As a leading participant in the rise of graffiti-based art, Lady Pink’s canvases have entered important art collections such as those of the Whitney Museum, the MET in New York City, the Brooklyn Museum and the Groningen Museum of Holland. She has established herself in the fine arts world, and her paintings are highly prized by collectors. Today, Lady Pink continues to create new paintings on canvas that express her unique personal vision. She also shares her 30 years of experience by holding mural workshops with teens and actively lecturing college students throughout the Northeast.